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program

We will promote the dialogue between theory and praxis, ethics and politics, past and future.

While offering plural perspectives on matters of political conflict and responsibility, the discussion will unfold over key and unavoidable recent developments with speakers taking part in impact discussions aimed at reaching concrete solutions to global justice issues, which might be effectively addressed locally or involve typical transnational challenges.



Provisional Schedule

Day 1
27 May 2019
Day 2
28 May 2019
Day 3
29 May 2019

Youth Summit Opening

The conferences kick off with the Youth Summit, a moment exclusively dedicated to engaging young people in the organization and management of meaningful debate. The Estoril Conferences promote the active participation of youngsters in discussions around topics which urgency they can acknowledge, having been born in a complex and globalized world. After the official opening ceremony, a dialogue between two generations of peace advocates will introduce the theme of Global Justice and what it accounts for given the current state of world affairs and escalation of political instability.
08:00 - 09:00

Accreditation

Youth Summit Opening

Empowering Youth

Dirk van Dierendonck

Panel Discussion

Changing the world through education

Education broadens our minds, enhancing our ability to hold different perspectives, which will shape our decisions and our actions when we go out into the world. Education increases innovation and productivity, it fosters positive social change, encouraging political participation, social equality or environmental sustainability – not only individually, but in a broad spectrum of our shared society. As Nelson Mandela said, “education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world”. How can education change the world? 
Teresa Bonvalot
Pedro Espírito Santo
Ahmad Nawaz
11:00 - 11:30

Break

Global Dialogue

Supporting the young changemakers

Global justice issues such as structural economic inequalities, technological development or climate change are also matters of intergenerational justice. A new generation of politicized youth is starting to claim their entitlement to a dignified future. While states and institutions become increasingly aware of young people’s voices, they are yet to acknowledge that unsustainable models of governance must be abandoned, and that change must start now. What can we do to fulfil our duties towards the new generations?
Pedro Neto

Keynote

The future of education

Javier Roglá Puig

Keynote

“Make some noise.”

José María del Corral
13:00 - 14:00

Lunch

Estoril Global Issues Distinguished Book Prize Ceremony

Future Politics: Living Together in a World Transformed by Tech tries to answer the question of how digital technology will transform politics and society in the future – and on what terms. In a world in which certain technologies will hold high power over us, those who control these technologies will increasingly control the rest of us. They will set the limits of our liberty, their algorithms will resolve questions of social justice, and they will decide on the future of democracy. What will it mean to be free and equal, in the future? 
Jamie Susskind

Panel Discussion

Lusophone Challenges

The lusophone community is built on shared values, history and language and it stands as an example of cooperation between countries working together to overcome their differences. However, a fiercer effort is required to meet the sustainable development goals, including the eradication of poverty and the rejection of inequalities. One of the main challenges faced by lusophone countries is the development of a global justice space deepening this real sense of community. How can this be achieved?
Adriana Calcanhotto
José Eduardo Agualusa
Carlos Carreiras

Panel Discussion

Pritzker Laureates on Architecture and the Right to Happiness

Architecture is deeply intertwined with our day-to-day lives, both reflecting and producing social inequalities, as it influences the way we lead our lives. As such, it is also endowed with the ability to build better lives for struggling people, and thus help construct a fairer world. Some of the world’s most renowned thinkers and professionals in the field will come forward to discuss the complex ways architecture relates with and impacts global justice matters – namely poverty, technology and climate change issues – by sharing their personal experiences and projects. 
Eduarda Lobato de Faria
16:30 - 17:00

Break

Welcoming address

Ten Years of Estoril Conferences

Miguel Pinto Luz

Official Opening Ceremony

No-One Left Behind

Accommodating different perspectives and interests is probably the most arduous task when discussing global justice. World leaders are the primary agents when it comes to responding to such a challenge, and are expected to voice global concerns with adequate integrity. What unites them to activists on the field when it comes to protecting human rights and accomplishing global justice? The answer must inevitably start by leaving no-one behind. 
Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović
Carlos Carreiras

Thinking Fairness: What Do We Owe To One Another?

The second day will be dedicated to topics regarding the interconnectedness of human rights and duties.  Addressing global justice demands acknowledging that alongside rights there are also duties. What should be valued and emphasized if we want to see real changes in the world: what do we owe to one another? The debate will be led to incorporate local and global scales, as well as discussion regarding individual and collective duties, aiming to disclose humanity’s failures and victories in defending human rights. 
08:00 - 09:00

Accreditation

Panel Discussion

Gender Justice: Thinking Parity on a Global Scale

This panel addresses the relation between global justice and recent gender equality claims. In contemporary societies, women’s movements have become one of the leading voices fighting against institutionalized discrimination of all kinds. Organizations and activists advocating feminism for the 99% are increasingly engaged with global ethics, human rights, disabilities studies, bioethics, climate change, and international development, with a crescent focus on the intersectionality of oppressions. What can global feminism do for a truly equal world? 
Sofana Dahlan
Maria João Marques
Edit Schlaffer

Panel Discussion

Discussing Human Rights and Duties

The question regarding the definition of human rights seems to have been rehabilitated by recent socio-political developments, from the United States’ migration policies to Chechnya’s alleged intolerance towards sexual minorities, leading the world to question the achievements of multilateralism. Moreover, arbitrary high-level action raises questions the actual legitimacy of universal rulings as extreme events such as terrorist acts or the murderous war in Syria, spark temptation to dismiss these abstract principles. So, what are human rights? Why should we defend them? How do they relate to human duties? 
Danilo Türk
João Taborda da Gama
Wang Hui
11:00 - 11:30

Break

Global Debate

Socialism of the 21st century: lessons from South America?

In a world where capitalism and traditional institutions are increasingly called into doubt as efficient and sustainable models, political theorists and citizens are both looking for new alternatives. A reframing of the socialist theory adapted to the needs of the 21st century has become increasingly appealing. While we are certainly in need of a model capable of resolving our global justice problems, we have by now learnt about the dangers of a statist society which takes away its citizens’ agency and political participation. The Latin American cases of democratic socialism are the most recent historical examples of the perils of the socialist promise. Can socialist theory ever materialize into a successful political experience? 
Jorge Quiroga
Luis Alberto Lacalle
Cátia Batista
Carlos Mesa
13:00 - 14:00

Lunch

Action Alert

The human responsibility to change the world

To think about global injustice is to acknowledge the contingency there is in being born in a specific place, at a particular time, within a peculiar context. To recognize privilege is then the first step to feel responsible towards the well-being of others, namely those who have circumstantially been born within a disadvantaged framework. However, how can individual and collective bodies effectively abolish structural inequalities? What are the most powerful ways to achieve real change?  
Joyce Banda
Anja Ringgren Lovén

Global Debate

Back to basics: democracy and the fight against corruption

Corruption remains one of the most significant challenges of our democracies, preventing people from leading dignified lives under the consecrated protection of their states. Given its negative impact on human rights enjoyment and development performance, it begs us to question the very political models we abide by. As such, speakers will not only address measures to tackle corruption, as they will also analyze the structural changes required for the problem to be eradicated. Is it possible to find alternative ways of political participation that allow for greater scrutiny of governmental activities? 
Janine Lélis
Sérgio Moro
Joana Marques Vidal
Germán Garavano
16:45 - 17:00

Break

Global Dialogue

New walls on the 30th anniversary of the Fall of the Berlin Wall

The repercussions of the world wars have had a lasting effect in the way individuals perceive justice and peace, and the ideological disengagement purported by the iron curtain is still felt today. As new walls are now being lifted all over the globe, we are then to address the ways how political actors can act to put differences aside in order to attain agreement in fundamental matters of global justice. We must ask ourselves what can be done to expose the demagogic rhetoric behind hate speech, while adequately addressing people’s real needs. How far have we come since the tragic events of the XX century?  
Svetlana Alexievich
Vaira Vīķe-Freiberga
Erik Kirschbaum

FROM THEORY TO ACTION: BUILDING THE WORLD WE DREAM ABOUT

On this last day, we will emphasize the practical dimension of the topic, engaging in a debate that aims to present real solutions to problems of global injustice. These include issues that affect people worldwide but also those which cannot be solved without coordinated action and the implementation of transnational policies. The subsequent panels will discuss possible responses to problems related to technology, extreme poverty, climate change, and human rights abuses that affect real people around the globe.
08:00 - 09:00

Accreditation

Panel Discussion

Crises in a time of crisis: between security and Human Rights

War and conflict have always been present throughout humanity’s history. However, current environmental, economic and technology-related issues only work to aggravate already fragile socio-political contexts. Furthermore, contemporary conflicts are heightened by a global conjuncture that allows for an unprecedented circulation of weapons, information and people, prompting the international community to intervene. However, how is this intervention to be carried out if it is to balance regional security policies with humanitarian assistance and the protection of fundamental rights worldwide? 
Benedetta Berti
Ronen Hoffman

Panel Discussion

Climate Change Justice: urgent action alert

Climate change is one of the most cross-cutting matters on the global agenda right now. Its urgency is due to the escalation of the problem, which is already directly affecting thousands of people worldwide, while also epitomizing every single dimension of global justice – from economic inequality to technological developments. Closely related subjects further concern the debate on natural resources distribution, including the establishment of clearing house mechanisms, and intergenerational responsibility. Who should be responsible for slowing down global warming and what sort of action should we undertake right now? 
Garrett McNamara
11:00 - 11:30

Break

Global Debate

Nobel Laureates on Global Poverty: the most significant crime against humanity?

In our 2019 Nobel panel, three laureates will discuss one of the most pressing global justice problems: extreme worldwide poverty. As it becomes increasingly evident that nations have the necessary resources to join efforts in order to eradicate it, the reasons for its prevalence in the XXI century should be addressed. What kind of interests are at play when it comes to creating a world where everyone is allowed the same opportunities and material conditions? Is it really in our hands to end global poverty once and for all? 
Bernard Kouchner
Daniel Traça
Rigoberta Menchú Tum
Edmund Phelps
13:00 - 14:00

Lunch

Global Dialogue

The crisis of democracy: from fear to hope?

The rise of so-called populist parties should be taken seriously as a clear sign that people feel wronged and betrayed by the State in ways that largely surpass ideology, leading them to support nationalist, xenophobe and misogynist policies. The emergence of illiberal democratic regimes all over the world introduces questions regarding the way democracy is perceived. We must then ask: what kind of changes does democracy need to endorse in order to prevail and protect fundamental rights and needs? 
Anne Applebaum
Teresa Violante

Global Dialogue

Globalization vs New Alternatives

Today, it is inconceivable for a nation to project its future in isolation. Globalization has connected the entire world through cooperation and collaboration, inclusiveness and a sense of shared responsibility in a world we have built together, collectively seeking answers to global challenges. However, the distribution of wealth has not been equal, and some of us have been left behind. New narratives presenting new alternatives have been popping up virtually everywhere in the world, inspired by similar fears and needs we all share. Is globalization still the answer or are these new alternatives capable of achieving a better world? 
Guy Verhofstadt
16:30 - 17:00

Break

Global Dialogue

Tech and democracy: towards a responsible globalization

Notwithstanding the improvements technology has brought to industrialized societies in the last century, it has also originated unprecedented challenges to humanity. Access to technology remains largely unequal on a global scale, accentuating disparity among countries. On the other hand, wealthy nations are now confronted with issues related to their extreme dependence on technology and questions arise regarding the future of work in societies where such reliance is increasingly preponderant. Because it is undeniably reconfiguring the way people share information and express their will as citizens, is technology hurting global democracy or helping to save it? 
Sofia Colares Alves
Jamie Bartlett

Plenary Panel

Lessons from the past

Those who can make a connection between past and present, who can measure the peculiarities of their own time against the recognized value of history, will be able to gather lessons from the past in order to prepare for a stronger future. With their unique insights into the world of politics and governance, former political leaders of the XXI century will share their experience and their thoughts on current forms of government and how prepared we indeed are to take on the upcoming challenges of a globalized world. What lessons should we learn from the past to take with us into our collective future?
José Manuel Barroso
George A. Papandreou
François Hollande
José Luis Zapatero
Miguel Pinto Luz

Closing Ceremony

Carlos Carreiras